LADY AUGUSTA GREGORY

 

Lady Augusta Gregory

Keeper of the Irish language

Protector of Irish Culture, Lady Gregory was a gentle force, but a force all the same. Her ability to juggle responsibilities, relationships and commitments played an important role in the Celtic Revival. In fact her contribution and her dedication to the revival spanned over decades and across a broad spectrum of interests and disciplines. She was a founder of the Abbey Theatre and patron of writers and artists such as W.B. Yeats. Her home in Coole provided an artistic space which became a place of artistic convergence, a place of inspiration. This essay will look at Lady Gregory’s aspirations and at the important role her body of work played in the Celtic Revival. Her work as a playwright, a writer of stories and essays, a translator of Irish myths and legends as well as her passion for the Irish language are legendary. Lady Gregory believed whole heartedly in the Celtic Revival and her aspirations as a nationalist meant she was committed to do whatever it took to restore and revive the dignity and liberty of Ireland. I am…. trying,’ she told Blunt with disarming naivety, ‘to help every movement that brings back dignity to the country,” (Hill, p149). History has shown that she and her body of work did exactly that.

Contempories

  1. Yeats
  2. George Russell
  3. Edward Martyn
  4. George Bernard Shaw

Places of interest

  • Roxbourgh
  • Coole
  • Abbey Theatre

Works

Cuchulain of Muirthemme The Celtic Twilight Kiltartanese Cathleen Ni Houlihan
1902 1898 1890’s 1905

Here are three links for further reading :-

Lady Augusta Gregory’s Wikipedia page.

Lady Augusta Gregory’s Britannica page.

Lady Augusta Gregory’s today in Irish History page.

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